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Tuesday, November 15, 2011 - MMH Spotlight: November is Diabetes Awareness Month
Article Fast Facts
- November is American Diabetes Month, a time to rally individuals, communities and families to join the millions in the movement to stop diabetes. Now is the time to act.
- Every 17 seconds, someone is diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined.
- Being overweight or obese raises your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
- If you already have diabetes, managing the disease can lower your risk of complications such as kidney failure, heart disease and stroke, blindness and amputations of legs and feet.
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November is Diabetes Awareness Month
Nearly 26 million children and adults in the U.S. are living with diabetes and another 79 million are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Recent numbers by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention paint a desperate situation of where we are at, and where we are headed:
- Every 17 seconds, someone is diagnosed with diabetes.
- Diabetes kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined.
- Recent estimates project that as many as 1 in 3 American adults will have diabetes in 2050.

November is American Diabetes Month, a time to rally individuals, communities and families to join the millions in the movement to stop diabetes. Now is the time to act.
If you already have diabetes, managing the disease can lower your risk of complications such as kidney failure, heart disease and stroke, blindness and amputations of legs and feet. Here are some important steps to take to control diabetes:

- Talk to your health care provider about how to manage your blood glucose (A1c), blood pressure and cholesterol.
- Stop smoking and do not use any other tobacco products.
- Get a flu vaccine. For those with diabetes, type 1 and type 2, it is important to ask for the “shot” version. Talk to your health care provider about a pneumonia (pneumococcal) shot. People with diabetes are more likely to die from pneumonia or influenza than people who do not have diabetes. CDC recommends that everybody aged 6 months and older get a flu vaccine, including family members of people with diabetes.
- Reach or stay at a healthy weight
- Make sure you’re physically active. Plan for 2 hours and 30 minutes each week of moderate physical activity, such as walking quickly or gardening, or 1hour and 15 minutes each week of vigorous physical activity, such as jogging or jumping rope. Add muscle strengthening activities on 2 or more days each week. Physical activity can help you control your weight, blood glucose and blood pressure, as well as raise your “good” cholesterol and lower your “bad” cholesterol.

Obesity is a Major Risk Factor
Being overweight or obese raises your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. To see whether you are at a healthy weight, check your body mass index (BMI). People with a body mass index of 25-29.9 are considered overweight, and people with a BMI of 30 or above are classified as obese.

Other risk factors for type 2 diabetes including the following:
- Age 45 or older
- Developed diabetes while pregnant (gestational diabetes)
- Have a parent, brother or sister with type 2 diabetes
- Are not physically active
- Belong to certain racial or ethnic groups. African Americans, Hispanic/Latino, American Indians and some Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are at high risk for type 2 diabetes.

Ways You Can Help Prevent Diabetes
Having a condition called prediabetes means you are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 3 to 6 years. People with prediabetes have blood glucose (sugar) levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. CDC estimates that 1 in 3 U.S. adults – 79 million people – have prediabetes.

Research trials have shown that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed in people at high risk for the disease who make lifestyle changes. Weight loss of 5 to 7 percent (about 10 to 14 pounds for a 200 pound person) and increasing physical activity to 150 minutes per week can reduce or delay the development of type 2 diabetes by nearly 60 percent.

Educating and Managing Diabetes with Marietta Memorial Hospital’s Diabetes Education Center
Marietta Memorial Hospital’s Diabetes Education Center believes that patient education is an integral component in the medical care for people with diabetes.

An Individualized Plan
In treating diabetes, an individualized education plan is essential as every patient has different needs. During the initial visit, knowledge and physical assessments are taken. Self-management education is then offered through group classes and one-on-one counseling sessions with the nurse educator and registered dietitian.

How to Use the Center
To access the services of the Diabetes Education Center, a referral by the patient’s physician is required. Throughout the educational process, educators will provide the referring physician with patient progress reports. For more information call (740) 568-1702.

MMH’s Diabetes Education Center is accredited by the American Diabetes Association.

The Memorial Health System is a not-for-profit health system governed by a volunteer board of community members that are committed to providing comprehensive services that meet the needs of our region. We are comprised of a network of two hospitals, outpatient service sites, assisted and long-term care facilities and a retirement community. We work in innovative ways to meet the healthcare challenges of today, while preparing for the health needs of our communities in the future.
Memorial Health System’s Accreditations & Awards
Memorial Health System
401 Matthew Street, Marietta, OH 45750
(740) 374-1400
© 2014, Memorial Health System.
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